Hartnett Leads Preservation Group

December 13, 2012 – Chris Hartnett, P.E., LEED AP, brings a passion for old buildings to his new position as leader of Meyer Borgman Johnson’s Preservation Engineering Group. His experience reflects a strong interest in archaic structures and materials and includes landmark projects such as the Minnesota State Capitol and the Faribault Woolen Mill. Chris has spoken on the analysis of masonry arches, the evaluation of historic wood, and the history of Gothic Arch barns in the Twin Cities and Boston. He is Past President of the Minnesota Chapter of the Structural Engineers Association and a member of the Association of Preservation Technology. Chris replaces Meghan Elliott, who now leads her own firm, Preservation Design Works.

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Related News:
Hartnett Presents at Wood Conference
Preserving Historic Minnesota

Turner on Five Story Wood

October 11, 2012 – On October 10, 2012, Ross Turner, PE, SE, presented a webinar entitled Wood Design Case Study: Five Story Mixed-Use Over Two Story Below-Grade Parking, through SE University, an online provider of continuing education for structural engineers. Ross used case studies to show how Meyer Borgman Johnson has utilized wood framing, along with permanent sheet piling, to achieve a better return on investment for developers. Ross presented the differences between traditional multistory wood design and five story wood design, and reviewed some of the engineering challenges that accompany this building type, as well as how to resolve those challenges. Engineers will also learn more about the types of projects that may benefit from permanent sheet piling foundations.

Ramerth Publishes Research Findings

August 31, 2012 – Firm principal Michael J. Ramerth, PE, with co-author Daniel M. Vruno, PE, wrote an article for the July 2012 issue of Concrete International magazine on the Minnesota Concrete Council’s findings regarding optimum slab-on-grade concrete. Mike chairs MCC’s Research Committee, which has been conducting studies on optimal concrete durability for more than ten years. The article summarizes knowledge gained through research about optimizing concrete proportioning to minimize curling, maximize finishability, and improve sustainability. The research is a joint effort between MCC and Target Corporation. Read the article here.

Doss-Smith To Speak at APT

August 9, 2012 – Patrick Doss-Smith, LEED AP, has been invited by the Association of Preservation Technology International (APT) Western Great Lakes Chapter to present a paper on November 3 to the 2012 Symposium in Chicago, Illinois. Doss-Smith’s presentation, entitled “Sustainable Preservation,” reflects on biomimicry principles as they relate to the preservation of historic buildings, with a focus on strategies for interim stabilization of historic buildings that remain untended for extended periods of time.

Biomimicry is the observation and imitation of mechanics in nature put to use in the world of human design. Doss-Smith will consider natural mechanisms, such as the tension of spider webs, spore dispersal of the Horsetail Fern, and color adaptation in the shell of the Hercules Beetle as providing possible solutions to controlling humidity in vacant historic structures.

The Association for Preservation Technology International is a cross-disciplinary, membership organization dedicated to promoting the best technology for conserving historic structures and their settings. APT members, who hail from more than 30 countries, include preservationists, architects, engineers, conservators, consultants, contractors, craftspersons, curators, developers, educators, historians, landscape architects, students, technicians, and other persons directly involved in the application of methods and materials to maintain, conserve, and protect historic structures and sites for future use and appreciation.

Doss-Smith is a structural technician in Meyer Borgman Johnson’s Minneapolis office. As a LEED accredited professional, he is a champion of sustainable design and practices in relation to both preservation and new structures.

Read an abstract of the presentation here.

Elliott 2012 Emerging Leader

August 2, 2012 – Meghan Elliott, P.E., has received the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota’s 2012 Emerging Leader Award, in recognition of her contributions to the preservation community through advocacy, government, education, and business. Elliott is an associate, structural engineer, and leader of the preservation engineering group at Meyer Borgman Johnson. She is also founder and owner of Preservation Design Works, a company that provides resources for the redevelopment of historic buildings.

Elliott promotes the advancement of preservation culture on several fronts. She is redevelopment co-chair of the historic 1883 National Purity Soap Factory for use as an art gallery. She is a member of the Board of Directors for Project for Pride in Living (PPL), a non-profit housing developer with an extensive track record of building rehabilitation. As an adjunct faculty member at the University of Minnesota College of Design, she teaches historic building conservation in the School of Architecture to graduate and upper level undergraduate students. From 2008-2011, Elliott served on the Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission (HPC), where she regularly interpreted and applied the Secretary of Interior Standards to buildings in the historic warehouse district and throughout Minneapolis. She is also a member of the Management Committee of the Construction History Society of America, a national organization dedicated to the study of the history and evolution of all aspects of the built environment.

Read her article Square Buildings and Round Bars: C.A.P. Turner and the Minneapolis Warehouse District in Construction History Society of America newsletter, Issue 13, October 2010.

Read an abstract of her presentation Testing the Limits: Long-Term Deflection of the C.A.P. Turner Flat-Slab Floor to the Construction History Society of America, 2009. Please, e-mail melliott@mbjeng.com to read the full paper.

Elliott Presents at APT Charleston

July 31, 2012 – Meghan Elliott, P.E., has been selected to present a paper at The Association for Preservation Technology International (APT) annual Conference in Charleston, South Carolina, taking place September 30–October 4, 2012. The conference theme is “Cornerstones: Collaborative Approaches to Preservation.”

Meghan’s paper, entitled “Construction History–C.A.P. Turner and the Minneapolis Warehouse District,” will focus on the structural design philosophy and innovations of American engineer C.A.P. Turner (1869-1955), specifically, his “mushroom” system. Included in her talk will be examples that demonstrate advantages and uses of Turner’s system, as well as causes for failure and methods of retrofitting buildings constructed using the system. She will, also, discuss the importance of construction history as a field of study, giving examples from the Minneapolis Warehouse District.

Meghan is an associate, structural engineer, and leader of the preservation engineering group at Meyer Borgman Johnson.

APT Charleston 2012 is the 44th annual convention hosted by APT, a cross-disciplinary, membership organization dedicated to promoting the best technology for conserving historic structures and their settings. APT members, who hail from more than 30 countries, include preservationists, architects, engineers, conservators, consultants, contractors, crafts persons, curators, developers, educators, historians, landscape architects, students, technicians, and other persons directly involved in the application of methods and materials to maintain, conserve, and protect historic structures and sites for future use and appreciation. Attendees can register at www.aptconference.org. Best rates are available prior to August 6.

Murphy Appointed to Licensing Board

July 2, 2012 – Principal Daniel E. Murphy, PE, has been appointed by the governor to Minnesota’s AELSLAGID board, an official arm of the state for licensing architecture, engineering, land surveying, landscape architecture, geosciences, and interior design professionals. The appointment is for a four-year term. Dan will serve alongside twenty-one other individuals, sixteen representing the regulated professions and five from the general public. Throughout his thirty-eight year career as a structural engineer, Dan has been active in the building community. He is a member of Minnesota State Building Code Structural Advisory Committee, holds the office of Secretary on the board of directors of the American Council of Engineering Companies Minnesota, and is a board member of ACE Mentor Program of America, a national organization helping youth discover their passion for careers in architecture, construction and engineering.

TCHEA Recognizes Irene Peterson

June 7, 2012 – Irene Peterson, P.E., was honored at the Twin City chapter of the Minnesota Healthcare Engineers Association Awards Banquet on Thursday evening, May 17, as the winner of the Fifteenth Annual Associate Member Achievement Award. She has been a member of the group for nearly four years. An associate at Meyer Borgman Johnson, Irene works closely with area health care organizations to understand their needs and provide structural engineering services for projects from small tenant improvements to larger projects, such as the Allina Central Lab in Minneapolis. The Twin City Healthcare Engineering Association’s mission is to provide a forum of education and interchange of ideas among members.

Preserving Historic Minnesota

May 8, 2012 – After being shuttered for four years, the Faribault Woolen Mill in Faribault, Minnesota, was recently reopened, due in part to the efforts of Meyer Borgman Johnson’s preservation engineers. The mill is the oldest manufacturing entity in the state, dating back to 1865. The current mill was built in 1890. MBJ’s preservation experts performed a complete condition assessment of the mill’s structure, which consists of eleven different additions and modifications spanning nearly a century. A variety of archaic wood and steel construction methods had been used to cobble together the expansions. Having made repairs sufficient to the operation of the mill, MBJ continues to work with the owners on further permanent solutions for restoration and renovation.

Buy a blanket from Faribault Woolen Mill.

Four MBJ Projects Recognized

May 8, 2012 – Twin Cities Business Journal announced the Best in Real Estate projects for 2012. Meyer Borgman Johnson was the structural engineer of record on four of the projects cited as winners or finalists. Allina Central Lab and Radisson Blu at Mall of America were named winners in the Hospitality Development, Redevelopment, or Renovation and the Industrial and Warehouse Development or Redevelopment categories, respectively. Two projects were finalists: Minneapolis Public Schools Educational Service Center in the Nonprofit and Community Impact Development or Redevelopment category and American Academy of Neurology in the Office Development or Redevelopment category.